Top Five Concerts of All Time

Most people have attended a concert, and many have walked out with a different experience. To some, the concert they attended will become a memory that they will always treasure. To others, it may have been a lacklustre performance that will be forgotten in a manner of weeks. Many will argue what makes a good concert. We have highlighted five concerts considered among the best below.

The Beatles – Shea Stadium, August 15, 1965

beatles-shay-stadiumImage – NY Daily News

While The Beatles were an undisputed talent during the 60s and 70s, it can be argued that not all the live performances were quite up to scratch. This was in part due to the sound arrangements, where the act would complain that they could not always hear themselves, thus making their performance a little sketchy at best.

The concert held at Shea Stadium in 1965 was a turning point for The Beatles, who would actually retire from public performances to concentrate more on producing more great albums. The concert encaptured the first era of The Beatles, and the concert would go on to be broadcast across the world. The material that followed in the coming years went on to become game-changing masterpieces.

Simon & Garfunkel – Central Park, New York City, September 19, 1965

It’s no secret that a lot of friction was present thought the career of Simon & Garfunkel, but non-one could dispute what a perfect musical duo they made. Paul Simon had composed great songs such as ‘Mrs Robinson ‘and ‘The Boxer’ and they never sounded so good live as they did on the night of September 19, 1965 partnered with Art Garfunkel’s haunting vocals.

The folk duo showcased their career through a 19-song set, which finished on a euphoric high with their rendition of ‘Bridge Over Troubled Water.’ The two were able to stand side by side and deliver the goods in a memorable and heartfelt concert that still holds its place in music history today.

Led Zeppelin – Madison Square Garden, New York City, 1973 – Three Shows

Utter the words ‘prog rock’ to anyone, and you can be sure that Led Zeppelin will be a band that’s brought to the surface.

It was back in 1973 when a trio of shows performed by Robert Plant and Co went on to cement the band’s legendary status. The performance has since been released on DVD as ‘The Song Remains the Same’ and features Jon Bonham’s effortless drumming, Jimmy Page’s hypnotising guitar playing, John Paul Jones’ thudding bass and Robert Plant’s soaring vocals. All these attributes are amalgamated together to create a 26-minute version of ‘Dazed and Confused.’

Pink Floyd – ‘The Wall,’ Global, February 1980 to June 1981

pink-floyd-the-wallImage – Neptune Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd released ‘The Wall’ back in November 1979 before the album was brought to life on film in 1982. ‘The Wall’ focuses on a drugged-out musician named Pink Floyd, who recalls his lonely upbringing through a series of hallucinations and flashbacks.

As expected, the story was told via a series of trippy visuals, and the same can be said for the concert that preceded it. The gig only occurred in four cities, Los Angeles, London, New York City and Dortmund in Germany, due to its epic stage setup. The lack of available dates was another reason why the concert went on to become one of the most memorable in music history.

The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, Wembley Stadium April 20, 1992

Queen has been part of the music world since the 1970s, thanks to its unique sound and flamboyant frontman, Freddie Mercury. Unfortunately, Freddie Mercury passed away on November 24, 1991, leaving a gap in the world of music that was going to be difficult to fill.

Queen had influenced a number of great artists, and the benefit for AIDS research gave them chance to say their final goodbyes, while playing tribute to the great man himself. A diverse number of acts such as Paul You, Def Leppard and Metallica came together to celebrate the life and works of Mercury via an unforgettable tribute concert.

The above concerts have for one reason to another resonated with their audience. Whether it was a rare show, or an electrical performance, the outcome was the same, a concert that would still be considered memorable so many years later.

Choosing a Music Venue

music-venue

When performing your art, it’s important that you are able to find a venue that will be able to meet your requirements. Booking a venue that isn’t designed for live music or is a little bigger than what you need can leave you performing to a half-empty room while struggling with some questionable acoustics.

The below tips will advise you what to look out for when deciding on your music venue, as it’s worth knowing exactly what is needed to make the concert a success. For example, one event may require plenty of room for your fans to jump around; and an altogether different kind of performance may require compfrtoable seating for your audience, so event furniture hire may be deemed the most important factor.

Determine Your Capacity

Of course, every act would like to think they are going to sell out concert halls by the thousands, but in the early days, we have to keep our feet firmly on the ground. If you think you’re going to pull in about 50 people, don’t go and book a venue built for 500. Similarly, if you think you’re able to pull in big numbers, don’t risk booking a smaller venue.

Know Your Age Demographic

While it can be difficult to know exactly who will be coming to a concert, bands will generally have a good idea of the age group of their fans. For example, if your fans are mostly still at high school, then there is very little point in booking an adult-only venue for your concert.

While the pickings are slim for events that aren’t 18+, there are venues who operate such nights, you just need to carry out a little research. The event may cost you more initially, but there is the opportunity to sell merchandise, and the young folks love to buy merchandise.

It can be an idea to build a steady list of venues each with their own pros and cons and what kind of events they cater for. This will make finding a venue in the future much easier.

Know Your Genre

When playing a venue, it’s important to note what kind of vibe the venue has going on. If you’re looking to play a rock-themed club, then it’s fairly unlikely than your 80s-inspired wizardry will sit well with the patrons.

Research venues beforehand to get an idea of the clientele, and whether there is anything your act can bring to the table. While it can be tempting to book loads of venues just to get some gig dates on your website, the outcome could be detrimental if not employed correctly.

Find Out About the Payment Terms Beforehand

Booking a venue can be costly sometimes, but the money paid can be worth it depending on what you’re receiving for the fee.

Have conversations with venues as to what you will be expected of you, and what services will be included with the hire fee. There are more unscrupulous venues that will offer ‘free venue hire,’ only to tell the one who booked the venue that they will have to pay for their own security and sound engineer.

Knowing the price beforehand is also important when deciding on how much to charge attendees, as this will be one of the main income streams that will cover your venue hire.

Ensure The Location is Accessible

The price can be an important factor when booking a venue as previously discussed, but there’s very little point in spending less on a venue based entirely on its location.

When booking a venue, consider how easy it will be for your potential audience to attend the show. You should look for somewhere that is close to public transport links, as well as providing those who drive with somewhere to park.

Booking a venue is more of an art than it is science, so a lot of it can be down to gut instinct. However, having a few strategies in place ensures that you’re paying the right price for a venue in the right location.

The Best Venues in London

london-concert-venues

Whether you’re in a band, or an avid fan of gigs, London is undoubtedly one of the most cultural cities in the world. As such, there are a number of venues throughout London that provide acts for a number of different genres. Below are some of those considered the best, whether you’re looking to go and see the latest headline act, or you’re looking for a London venue hire to host your own event, (and if you are, companies like G and D Events are great for finding someting unique – they do Christmas parties too).

Bush Hall

Although the smaller of the two Shepherd’s Bush venues available in London, it has an elaborate interior that really adds to the atmosphere of live music, as do the elevated ceilings. Bush Hall has been host to the who’s who of modern music, with startling performances from acts including The Killers and REM. There’s even an area tucked away for the more vocal, so those who are there to enjoy the music can do so without interruption.

Madame JoJo’s

Those who are fans of the 1970s will feel right at home at Made Jojos’s. Porn baron Paul Raymond initially opened the venue as a generic club, before moving over the deco fittings from the Whitehall Theatre, turning it into the glitzy venue it is today. Sitting in the heart of Soho, Madame Jojo’s offers a number of different club nights including White Heat, a showcase that allows new acts to showcase their talents.

Café Oto

Where many venues come complete with their own vibe, Café Oto offers something a little different. Some may scoff at its minimalistic approach of white walls and no visible stage, but it’s little quirks such as these that allow artists within the venue to truly express themselves. Acts that have performed at the venue include Ghedlia Tazartes and Miki Yui. Those who a bit peckish can also take advantage of the Persian inspired food.

The Vortex

It’s a common misconception that jazz is for people of a certain age. The Vortex looks to dispel this myth by offering its patrons a selection of contemporary jazz performances seven days a week. The venue itself has a quirky design that somehow works, and is home to a multitude of different styles and influences. It has also hosted nights by some of the most recognised names in Jazz, including Polar Bear and Sir John Dankworth.

Plan B

Those looking for a mix of live bands and DJ sets could do worse than to visit Plan B. The venue was reopened in 2009 by electronic group Hot Chip, and has seen a plethora of successful nights since. Boasting a warehouse-style interior and neon strip lighting, the whole venue has an ambient feel and has seen artists such as James Blake perform, as well as hosting DJ sets from LCD Soundsystem and Basement Jaxx.

Barbican

Of course, it’s not all about jazz and rock music. Sometimes music buffs require something a little more laid back. The Barbican is able to cater for such tastes thanks to its classical and contemporary acts. The acoustics within the venue are crystal clear, and the venue itself can easily hold up to 2,000 music fans. The venue has also been used by artists who wish to strip back the songs for a more organic feel. Once such act to employ this tactic was Antony and the Johnsons back in 2009. The venue goes beyond music and is able to offer its visitors a mix of theatre performances, art exhibitions and film screenings.

The venues listed are only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to music venues in London, but it does show how diverse and unique the options are for music lovers who visit London.

The Hollywood Bowl

It has to be one of the most iconic venues, that’s been used for literally all types of concerts and events.

Here’s a short video that gives you a really good idea of the size of the venue – it’s appearance in films and on TV doesn’t really do it justice.